Trucking Pre-Trip Inspection Guide

Semi Truck Pre-Trip Inspection
As a professional driver, your pre-trip inspection is a critical step in ensuring your truck is road worthy before each long haul. The inspections should be quite comprehensive, and for some can be quite difficult to remember, especially if you’re in pursuit of your commercial driver’s license (CDL). To that end, we’ve compiled the essential steps a thorough pre-trip inspection should have.

The point of a thorough pre-trip inspection is to ensure that your vehicle’s major components operate as intended. This inspection should be done at the start of each day, as well as once every 24 hours, after every 10-hour break and after you pick up a new trailer.

Before you begin make sure you have the necessary tools – gloves, flashlight and a hammer. Then check that the parking brakes are set and the transmission is in first gear. Driving an automatic? Be sure to place wheel chocks under the drive tires.

Next, you’ll want to turn on your headlights, activate your brake lights and switch on your four-ways.  Now you’re ready to proceed through your pre-trip inspection:

  1.  Look under the hood

    Look under the hood and inspect the carriage for anything that shouldn’t be there – road debris can easily get caught up here. Evaluate both sides of the engine, all of your hoses, wiring, reservoirs, filters, dryers and fluid levels. Thoroughly check your air dryer, alternator, brake air lines, brake chambers, slack adjusters, brake linings, brake drums, springs, spring mounts, shock absorbers, tires, tire pressure, tread depth, wheels, lug nuts, valve caps, hub oil, steering gear box and steering linkage.

  2. Check the left side of the cab

    Check the steps, on top of and underneath your cab for any unwanted items. Additionally, inspect your mirror, turn signal, lights, door, side skirting, steps, fuel tank/cap, reflectors and reflective tape, sleeper side, sleeper berth window glass and your DOT annual inspection sticker.

  3. Check the rear of the cab

    Here you’ll want to check the chain and battery boxes, fuel tanks, exhaust and chassis. Evaluate airlines, electrical cords, the cab suspension system, cross members, frame, and drive shaft.

  4. Check the front of your trailer

    Check your body panels, lights, reflectors and reflective tape, as well as your airlines, electrical cord, and stickers (height and preventative maintenance).

  5. Check your coupling

    Evaluate your release arm, fifth wheel mount, stop blocks, slide locking pins, fifth wheel pivot pins and pin locks, platform, apron, kingpin, gap and locking bar/jaw. Remember to use a flashlight when checking for correct coupling.

  6. Check your left side drive axles and suspension.

    Check for unusual items on your wheels, brakes, tires and suspension. Take special care to check your tires for any abrasions, bulges or cuts. Be sure to also check the air pressure, tread depth, wheels, lug nuts, hub oil seals, valve caps, air lines, brake chambers, brake linings, slack adjusters, drums, linings, air bags, shock absorbers, springs, spring mounts, U-bolts, torque rods, splash guards and lights.

  7. Check the left side of the trailer.

    Check underneath and the sides of the trailer for any unwanted modifications. Check your lights, reflectors and reflective tape, landing gear, underside, frame, top and bottom rails, body panels, tandem release handle, locking pins and air lines.

  8. Check your trailer suspension system

    Evaluate the wheels, brakes, tires, and suspension for any changes.  Check tires, air pressure, tread depth, wheels, lug nuts, hub oil seals, valve caps, air lines, brake chambers, brake linings, slack adjusters, drums, linings, springs, spring mounts, shock absorbers, U-bolts, torque rods and air tanks.

  9. Check the rear of the trailer

    Examine your seals, doors, hinges and bumper to check for anything unusual.  Also check your lights, reflectors and reflective tape, doors, door seals, door chains, door hooks, hinges, latches, license plate, splash guards and seal or padlock.

  10. Check your trailer suspension system

    Again, evaluate the wheels, brakes, tires, and suspension for any changes.  Check tires, air pressure, tread depth, wheels, lug nuts, hub oil seals, valve caps, air lines, brake chambers, brake linings, slack adjusters, drums, linings, springs, spring mounts, shock absorbers, U-bolts, torque rods and air tanks.

  11. Check the right side of the trailer

    Check underneath and the sides of the trailer for any unwanted modifications. Check your lights, reflectors and reflective tape, landing gear, underside, frame, top and bottom rails, body panels, tandem release handle, locking pins and air lines.

  12. Check your right side drive axles and suspension

    Check for unusual items on your wheels, brakes, tires and suspension.  Take special care to check your tires for any abrasions, bulges or cuts. Be sure to also check the air pressure, tread depth, wheels, lug nuts, hub oil seals, valve caps, air lines, brake chambers, brake linings, slack adjusters, drums, linings, air bags, shock absorbers, springs, spring mounts, U-bolts, torque rods, splash guards and lights.

  13. Check the front of your trailer

    Again, heck your body panels, lights, reflectors and reflective tape, as well as your airlines, electrical cord, and stickers (height and preventative maintenance).

  14. Check the rear of the cab

    And again, you’ll want to check the chain and battery boxes, fuel tanks, exhaust and chassis.  Evaluate airlines, electrical cords, the cab suspension system, cross members, frame, and drive shaft.

  15. Check the right side of the cab

    Check the steps, on top of and underneath your cab for any unwanted items.  Additionally, inspect your mirror, turn signal, lights, door, side skirting, steps, fuel tank/cap, reflectors and reflective tape, sleeper side, sleeper berth window glass and your DOT annual inspection sticker.

  16. Close the hood

    Evaluating the latch, hood mirrors and mirror brackets, as well as the hood for any unwanted items.

  17. Check the front of the tractor

    Check your bumper, license plate, windshield and lights. Also check your headlights and markers.  Remember to ensure the ID lights are operational and the lens is clean, and not cracked or broken.

  18. Check inside the driver side door

    Evaluate your clutch free play, accelerator, brake pedal, permit book and fire extinguisher/emergency kit.

  19. Check inside the cab

    You can now cancel your brake lights and four-ways.  Then check your turn signal and high-beam indicators, check the gauges, steering free play, horn, heater and defroster, shift lever, windshield wipers and washer and your in-cab air brake tests.

After checking off every item on this list, you’ll now know that your rig is in tip top, road ready shape.  Drive safe, truckers!

Healthy Tips for Truckers

Long haul drivers travel long distances frequently and can be away from home for weeks at a time.  For many, it’s a rough job that can lead to an unhealthy lifestyle, as the very nature of the work is sedentary and somewhat monotonous. As a result, many look to stimulants such as caffeine and sugar to keep them awake and satiated, which can prove to be a dangerous choice. Rest stops and convenience stores add to the problem, as food choices trend toward the unhealthy and make choosing healthier options difficult.  In conjunction with a grueling work schedule where sleep can be irregular and exercise options are limited, you’ve got a dangerous combination that leads to potential disaster.

The good news is there are a few simple steps truckers can take to avoid these unhealthy tendencies. With a little tweak in routine and food choices, truckers can look forward to a well-balanced lifestyle that leaves them feeling energized and avoids burnout, all of which is essential to a successful career as an OTR trucker.

Healthy Tips for Truckers

  1. Eat Healthy on the Go

    Part of the problem with trying to eat while rolling the roads is fast food, soda and junk are often the most readily available, and more affordable eating options. However, these unhealthy options can be costly in the long run as they lead to many health issues that can impact your ability to work. Rather than pick what’s cheap and easy, go for food and drink choices that stabilize your blood sugar and boost your immune system.  Stock up on snacks that are high in protein and low in sugar to keep your hunger at bay between meals – this way you won’t overdo it when you sit down for meals. And when you do sit down for your meals, aim for lighter far such as salads and wraps, rather than burgers and fries.

  2. Exercise

    Trucking is one of the most sedentary jobs out there, and sitting for long periods of time can really take a tole on your body. Exercising for as little as 30 minutes a day can mean all the difference in how you body handles the stress of sitting. Your best bet is to just stick with the basics – light stretching before to help loosen your muscles, then a round of cardio to get your heart going. A simple jog or brisk walk around the lot can really help keep your heart healthy, and is a simple, yet effective task that can be done anywhere.  And if you’re looking to build more muscle, small dumbbells of 5 – 10 lbs can be easily help you bulk up by doing alternating bicep curls, shoulder presses and other weight lifting exercises, and they can easily be stowed away in your cab without taking up much room.

  3. Get plenty of sleep

    Getting enough sleep is crucial to your safety. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, more than 30% of long haul truckers have admitted to nodding off while driving.  That is a dangerous behavior, that could very well end in disaster – so getting plenty of sleep is an absolute must.

While there are many tips out there for healthy living while long-haul trucking, these three tips are the core of what will help you structure your new, healthier lifestyle. For those of you who already implement these tips, what else would you add for someone looking to get healthy on the road?

10 Things Truckers Learn In Their First Year

The first year as a professional driver is often the hardest to handle – you’re still learning the ropes, and you’re low on experiences that can help you navigate life’s many potholes.

Luckily, there are seasoned vets who can share what it’s like that first year to help give you some foresight as to what you might encounter. Here’s one man’s experiences, as he posted in the Reddit Truckers forum:

“I became a truck driver back in Feb. of 2017 by joining a Mega willing to train me through their program. I see a lot of posts on this awesome sub where people ask ‘this and that’ about their first year, wanting to know if trucking circa 2018 is for them.

Well, I can add what I’ve learned and hope this is helpful to someone who is either trying to get into the road game or is in the middle of their first year.

In descending order of importance:

10: Everyone is out to get something from you in one way or another. Everyone.

If you drive for a mega with a mentor/trainer/whichever, they’re training you for the money and chances are they’re going to exploit the situation, be it keeping you on the truck longer than you really need to be, using your ELD login to squeeze in more hours, some may even try to trick you into staying on the truck longer. Once you get your own truck, your dispatcher may try to find ways to exploit you for different things.

But chances are, the company is exploiting them, too. The trainer/mentor thinks he’s getting over on you, but the company’s business model suggests that he’s effectively training his replacement should he ever get 1 preventable accident too many. Meanwhile, the greedy dispatchers are greedy because the company is forcing them to compete with one another while making them manage more trucks than they can effectively handle because it’s “cost effective.”

Everyone is screwing everyone over; trucking is just one of those kinds of industries.

9: The money is THERE

Believe it — I have four years of college education; maxed out at 39k income on my best post-grad job with 4 years experience. I made 52k in year one as a driver.

8: Murphy’s Law is Absolute

No matter how well or not-well you were trained in semi-school or how well prepared you believe yourself to be, SOMETHING is going to happen out there during year one that you just didn’t expect.

7: Don’t be afraid to ask for help

I used to have a lot of trouble backing into both docks and truck stops, especially during my first solo runs. I would get out and ask another, more experienced driver for a spot and they would not only help, they would offer tips on how to back. After doing this for awhile, I didn’t need to ask for help. As a result, I help anyone who asks me…which leads me to…

6: Truckers are a brotherhood

We’re largely in competition with each other, but I can remember very few instances where I’ve had a confrontation with another driver, or another driver was rude to me. It’s the opposite; when you walk into a truck stop lounge or sit at the Driver’s Only section of an Iron Skillet, drivers chat and joke as though they’ve known each other for years. Drivers who are military vets seem to bond especially fast.

5: Finding parking for 10-Hour break doesn’t have to be hell

Truck stop full? Learn to navigate around strip mall lots, shopping plaza lots, and Walmart parking lots so you can park in the rear; out of sight is out of mind. Hell, I’ve never been kicked out of Walmart lot and I’ve never heard of someone being kicked out of a Walmart lot. I’ve asked a Walmart manager why that is and she replied ‘The longer y’all stay, the more money y’all spend.’

4: You will come across a jerky Yard Dog, but don’t take it personally.

They’re paid to not only move trailers around the yard, but to keep the truckers in line while they’re in the yard. Sometimes, they have to be jerks in order to do their job; it’s that simple.

3: Contrary to popular belief, ELD is your FRIEND

There’s not much to say about ELD that hasn’t already been said, so I’ll keep it simple and say that no, not everyone wants to drive 16-17 hours a day and only sleep for 5. If some trucking companies had their way, those are exactly the kind of hours everyone would drive.

2: Respect is not given NOR earned; it’s demanded

The world doesn’t respect truckers, eh? Truth is, most professions aren’t “respected,” especially in the U.S., unless they’re super-profitable. I get more respect as a truck driver than I did as a teacher for that very reason, I think.

Shippers/receivers, dispatchers, trainers/mentors will try to screw you over, but you don’t have to let them. Stand your ground, being respectful as you do so, and you’ll be surprised how often you’ll get what you need when it’s otherwise being denied to you.

1: America is beautiful

The high-hills of Washington state, the Arizona plateaus, the mountainous PA views…the sight of lightning scattering across the Wyoming plains at night… the U.S. has some sights which will not only confirm to you that there is a God who created it all, but that He holds you in his favor because you’re in a position to witness it.”

-ivyentre

If you’re a professional driver, what would you add to this list as something you learned in your first year?

*Slightly edited for language and clarity.

Beat The Heat – On The Road In Warm Weather

The temperatures have peaked, the pavement is hot and the smell of sweat and BBQ fill the air.  It’s Summer!

While it’s nice to see the sun and spend time with family on summer vacations, those that have to work in summer months face heat hazardous that can make professional driving a pain. Taking precautions to not only protect yourself, but also your vehicle as well are important to your survival of these sweltering summer days.

The most important component of these scenarios is obviously YOU, the driver. Top tip #1 – stay hydrated. This really isn’t just a summer months kind of tip either – staying hydrated while driving is always important as it helps avoid fatigue, dehydration and a whole host of other issues caused by not having enough fluids in your system. Bring water bottles with you in your cab and pack hydrating fruits such as watermelon or strawberries to snack on.

In addition, pay special attention to the signs of dehydration like dizziness, disorientation, and extreme sleepiness.  If you experience any of these symptoms, pull over immediately and re-hydrate and rest to avoid any potential accidents.

When it comes to your rig, there are a few key parts to check that can be adversely affected by heat.

Battery

Heat is a notorious drain on batteries, so make sure you’re not heading out on a long trip with an old half empty battery or you probably won’t be making it back.

Fluids

All of your fluids deserve your attention before any trip, but in hot weather your coolant should be checked frequently. Heat evaporates liquids, so also check your motor oil, transmission fluid, brake fluid, etc. Make sure you also check when you get to your destination – remember, it’s always better to be too careful, than not careful enough.

Tires

Checking your tires is another any-time-you-leave kind of check, but in high heat weather, it’s even more important. Temperature fluctuations, especially sudden ones, can be hard on your tire pressure. Avoid blow outs and potential accidents by tending to your tires regularly.

Taking these precautions when driving in the heat can prevent accidents and damage to your vehicle. Taking care of yourself by staying hydrated, checking the necessary mechanics and fluids, and making sure your tires are in good shape are the basic steps you need to take when planning to hit the road during the summer.

How To Combat Road Rage

Just because you’re a professional driver doesn’t mean your immune to frustrations and anger produced from dealing with other bad drivers and road hazards. Whether you’re yelling at the person in front of you for going 20 miles under the speed limit, or you’re honking at the car in front of you who cut you off, road rage affects us all. This is why it’s important to understand what causes road rage and how we’re able to avoid it.

Aside from the normal external factors that inspire a bought of road rage , internal factors like hunger, fatigue, and stress can affect our attitude on the road too. Add to that time constraints and the concept of making deliveries on time, and you are facing an assured increase in agitation.

While we can’t promise you we’ll be able to prevent ANY road rage, there are a handful of ways you can deal with it more effectively and prevent yourself from becoming too worked up.

  1. Leave as close to on-time as possible. This may seem like a no-brainer, but being uptight about your schedule is always better than worrying that you’re going to be late for the duration of your drive.
  2. Calm yourself with music that soothes, rather than stresses.  Avoid heavy bass songs or tempos that are too fast.
  3. Deep breathing will help lower your heart rate and reduce your anxiety.

And lastly, if you can’t seem to calm yourself down, pull over and find a place to get out. Sometimes walking away from our stressor, in this case driving, is the only way to reset yourself and find balance again.

We have to understand that road rage is not only  bad for our health, but that’s it dangerous to ourselves and others. So stay calm, and carry on for your piece of mind and safety.

How To Deal With Being Away From Home

Extended time away from home is a primary concern for a lot of truckers – it means long stretches of time away from loved ones, and a sudden shift in the lives of your family’s day to day routine. For both parties, the one on the road and the one at home, navigating this period can be tricky – but, there is hope. With the below tips and reminders, long haul assignments won’t seem so scary:

Understanding Roles & Expectations

In a lot of instances, drivers are the primary breadwinners of their families, so the pressure to succeed and earn is heavy on their shoulders. Equally as important is the roll of whomever is staying at home to tend to the family and insure the home base is running smoothly. Respecting the stress and weight of the demands each role is vital to communicating effectively about what to expect during this stressful time and any expectations that may need to be met.

Communicate

These periods of separation when on the road can be made even more stressful if communication is not clear and consistent with your family. Be sure to include your partner in any decisions you’re making about employment and assignments so they feel like you’re all on the same team. And conversely, home base partners should be open and honest about how they’re feeling and any decisions they need to make about family life so that the driver is included and still considered present, despite their absence.

Support

The decision to leave home and family behind to support spouses and kids is not a decision many drivers make lightly.The decision to put their comfort aside for the betterment of the family is noble, and supporting them emotionally in making that decision is very important. Communicate frequently, and often, and let the driver know how much their sacrifice means to the family. Being reminded of your “WHY” is always a great motivator to continue on in tough times.

Equally is important, is support for the caretaker at home. Being the family manager is stressful too, and feelings of abandonment can quickly creep in if drivers aren’t good about praising the work also being done at home. Remember, they’re just as lonely, and deserving of praise as the breadwinner.

Trust

Trust is a must. If jealousy is a problem before heading out on the road, you may way to consider staying home. Having to worry about partners expectations and emotional issues due to jealousy can be distracting and cause drivers to perform poorly, which impacts everyone negatively. Having trust and nurturing it by communicating honestly and openly are the only ways to enduring these long stretches between home visits.

In the end, surviving long hauls and time away from home comes down to understanding, communication, support and trust. Be good to each other, support each other, and most importantly, don’t waste any time you do have together.

Truckers Favorite Truck Stops

Professional drivers know that not all truck stops are created equal, and they all have their favorites. Whether it’s the showers, the travel plaza, fueling stations or the food, each stop has perks that make them fan favorites. Here are some of the favorites, as found on Reddit’s r/Truckers thread:

Kwik Trip/Kwik Star. I know, they may not be considered a truck stop, but if they have parking, they will always be my first choice. I’ve always seen nice employees, clean inside and out (except in Tomah, was ready to retch with the smell of piss) good coffee, and seem to always have breakfast sandwiches. My favorite part is the selection of fresh groceries no other truck stop has.

-SexyNerdyChick

TA/Petro is my favorite of the national chains. Dunno why. Just feels more trucker-centric. Loves and PFJ feel like they’re more interested in the 4-wheelers, with truckers as an afterthought. Plus, much more likely to find empty slots in the fuel isle at TA/Petro, all else being equal.

If I don’t need fuel or a shower, I’m happy with damn near anything, though. Especially if they have a good diner attached.

-volstedgridban

Love’s by a long shot. Hell, I was 19 gallons shy of platinum status last month, tweeted about it, and they bumped me to platinum just cuz they’re cool like that.

The showers are usually awesome, BUT I hate that they don’t have a dedicated person cleaning them like PFJ and TA/P so they almost always have a wait. Even in the middle of the day it can be hit or miss.

I avoid the older Love’s though. The newest ones are always the best. With each one they build, they really improve on the parking layout. Some of the newest ones are so easy to park, not like the other majors where it can be super tight.

We also love to support the independent stops. While we can’t fuel there, we often times park and eat in their restaurants. Found some damn good chow that way.

-chickiedrives

I’ll second the KwikTrip/KwikStar mentioned earlier. Great chain, great food, low prices. Just wish more of them had showers.

If more Love’s had laundry, they’d be the top of the big 5. Until then, it’s PFJ.

After TA/Petro turned several of their locations into majority paid parking, I stopped giving them any business. Still, if there’s free parking and I need a spot, I’ll stop and use their facilities.

-NBS_Patriot

I’ve found that having a franchise name doesn’t mean anything about the cleanliness/quality of the stop. I’ve been in big name stops that we’re downright disgusting. That said, if there’s a Love’s, a T/A, a pilot, and an independent all where I need to stop, I’m probably checking out the Love’s first.

-Mediocre_george

 

Now it’s your turn truckers!  What’s your favorite truck stop to take a break at, and why?  What’s your least favorite?

What Do You Look For In A Trucking Company?

Black & White Big Rig Semi TruckYou’ve decided to jump into trucking, and have your CDL all set to go. You’re ready to start earning, and are eager to hit the road.  There’s just one question left to answer: what trucking company will you work for?

When looking at trucking companies and comparing their businesses and how they treat employees, there are a few key areas you’ll want to pay special attention to, as they can be very telling on whether this is the company you’ll want to commit to long-term.

Driver Turnover

The most telling way a company isn’t kind to their employees is their turnover rate, trucking companies included. If drivers are leaving in droves, or they’re leaving quickly after initial employment, this is a red flag indicating a company that doesn’t make good on promises, treats drivers poorly and should generally be avoided.

Sign On Bonuses

While they may seem enticing at first, sign on bonuses can forebode bad things to come. This is especially true if the company appears to consist solely of new drivers. If a company is so desperate to sign up drivers that they’re willing to issue money up front, consider this a sign that the above mentioned driver turnover rate is probably quite high.

CPM or Hourly

There are arguments for both sides of the coin when it comes to getting pair by the mile versus hourly, but in the end it’s important to consider which is best for you.  If you’re being paid on a CPM model, you’ll want to ask if they guarantee miles, and how many they guarantee.  This could greatly effect the cents per mile you’re willing to take, and should be factored in to any financial goals you’ve set for yourself.

Equipment

Another extremely important factor in assessing whether you want to work for a trucking company is whether or not they’re working with good equipment.  While not all old equipment is bad equipment, you want to make sure that you can work safely in a reliable rig that can help you get the job done. Another important thing to consider is if you’ll have any say on which trucks you prefer to drive, or will you be assigned a truck without any consideration for your preferences?

Pay and Benefits

As with any job, the rate of pay and additional benefits are at the core of your consideration for employment. Being valued as an employee and having that reflected in your compensation is a fair expectation to have of any employer. However, consider company culture and all of the above complicating factors when weighing pay, as your job satisfaction is equally important to your paycheck.  Some companies will use higher CPM’s to lure driver’s in, and then use it as a justification for not being an ideal employer.

And now it’s your turn – what other things should drivers consider when evaluating a trucking company for potential employment opportunities? What would you add to this list?

 

How to Stay Alert on a Long Haul

Long haul truck drivers work long, grueling hours to reach their final destination and the road can be a bit boring after a while. It’s not always easy to know what the signs of being drowsy are, but it’s important to know what to look for and how to handle drowsiness to protect the safety of everyone on the road. Here are some signs that it might be time to pull over:

  • Frequent blinking, or heavy eyelids and difficulty focusing
  • Trouble recalling the last few miles driven, missed exits or traffic signals
  • Yawning, rubbing your eyes and trouble keeping your head up
  • Drifting, tailgating, or hitting a shoulder rumble strip
  • Feeling restless and irritable

Drowsy driving can result in catastrophic repercussions, so it’s important as a professional driver to remain alert and ready for anything the road throws your way. Here are some top tips for staying awake while driving:

Rest

To function properly, your body needs sleep – so it is of the utmost importance that you get plenty of rest.  The easiest way to make sure you’re getting the right amount of rest, is to stick to a sleep schedule. Avoid caffeine during the latter half of the day and don’t eat heavy meals that might cause digestive issues towards the evening hours.

If you feel yourself getting fatigued while you’re on the road, don’t fight the urge to rest.  Pull over and take a few minutes to stretch, walk around a little and get outside. If a nap is needed, try and keep it to a maximum of 45 minutes so it doesn’t disturb your nighttime sleep routine.

Stay Nourished and Hydrated

Eating healthy on the road is a great way to keep your blood sugar stable, which helps you stay alert without getting the dreaded crash after you eat, sugary, unhealthy foods.  Pack yourself healthy, well-balanced meals and snacks to eat on your journey rather than fast foods and convenience store snacks. And be sure to stay hydrated.  While it may cause you to stop a time or two more than normal, drinking lots of water will prevent dehydration and in turn avoid fatigue from plaguing your trip.

At Platinum Drivers, we are committed to providing a safe and high-quality experience for drivers and customers. If you are a qualified driver or you are looking for one, contact us today!

How do you pass the time when you’re waiting to be unloaded?

It happens to everyone – you show up to make your delivery, and there’s a wait to get you unloaded. While it is surely frustrating for everyone who encounters this scenario, each driver handles that time differently.  Here are some of the ways professional drivers pass the time while they’re waiting to be unloaded:

Reddit. YouTube. Clean inside of truck. Freak out and check Truckerpath assuming everything will be full by the time I’m loaded.

Usually I’m winding up straps, putting away chains, generally keeping an eye on the forklift because they’ll let anyone with a pulse drive the damn things.

Nap, or try to. This time I gave up, and am surfing reddit.

Sleep, make sure dispatch has next load ready… I assure you, you can’t get enough sleep.. take it while you can.

Hound the dispatcher for my next load if not scheduled…….

If i know I’m waiting over 2 hours, I hit the sleeper for a nap. If 30-60mins, then just walk around, surf fb reddit, youtube.

Typically I’ll do paperwork if it needs done, then review and mentally track a trip plan in my head about half a dozen times, while simultaneously checking trucker path and the Maps app to see where I’ll be laying my head for the night. Once I get all that squared away, I’ll grab a light snack or two and relax in the bunk, either by playing video games, surfing the web, or watching Netflix. If I’ve reached the point of watching Netflix, it’s because I’ve decided to get some zzz’s.

  • AngryJammer

Gaming laptop. PS4. Nintendo Switch. Walk the dog. Reddit.

What’s your favorite way to pass the time while waiting to be unloaded?